Indiana on track to have 150% more pharmacy robberies in 2016 than 2015

 

Indiana-Attorney-General-Greg-Zoellerhttps://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Mike_Pence%2C_official_portrait%2C_112th_Congress.jpg?resize=149%2C224&ssl=1

With 68 pharmacy robberies during the first five months of 2015, Indiana has twice as many pharmacy robberies as California and more than five times more than Texas. In 2014, Indiana had 78 pharmacy robberies.

So far in 2015.. there has been more robberies in Indiana than the NEXT TWO STATES

http://drugtopics.modernmedicine.com/drug-topics/news/top-20-states-pharmacy-robberies?cfcache=true

Pence and Zoeller are running for re-election this November and on TV Pence’s campaign ads are focused on all the new jobs that have been created in Indiana during his first term. Apparently robbing pharmacies is a pretty profitable business… since it would appear that most robberies were done by DIVERTERS… that have a business plan. Besides any business that has a ZERO COST of product acquisition should be able to make a good profit.

Knowing your rights

img20160531_0119Knowing your rights

www.medicareinteractive.org/get-answers/overview-of-medicare-health-coverage-options/changing-medicare-health-coverage/the-five-star-rating-system-and-medicare-plan-enrollment

This is the front page of a brochure that I received from our Medicare Part D program. All providers involved with Medicare are now subject to a STAR RATING SYSTEM.. If you are unhappy with your provider of services covered by Medicare and you don’t complain… they will continue to get HIGH RATINGS… if pts complain.. Medicare are suppose to take action and if enough complaints are filed… it is suppose to affect the reimbursements that the provider receives for services provided to ALL PATIENTS.

Silver Script is the second or third largest Part D provider.. so other Part D providers (PDP) may be sending out similar brochures. On the front page of this brochure they state:

We’re committed to working with you, your doctor and your Pharmacist to help you stay adherent to your medication

So if anyone from your PDP, doctor, pharmacist is involved with you – as a patient – interferes or hinders you being complaint with your necessary medication for your chronic disease… Medicare would appear to like to hear about how your proper care was interfered with.. That can be done at www.medicare.gov (800 MEDICARE) of if you believe that you where discriminated against under the Americans with Disability Act… you should contact the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of Health and Human Services ( HHS) 800.447.8477

If you are treated poorly, denied care and you say NOTHING.. they will keep their high star rating and they will continue to not provide the care that patients are entitled to

 

 

Cover your ass.. because they are covering theirs

pencam

http://www.amazon.com/Camera-Motion-Activated-U-Guard-Security/dp/B00NQ8353W?ie=UTF8&keywords=video%20pen&qid=1464647360&ref_=sr_1_14&sr=8-14

Have you ever had someone tell you that you must do something or can’t do something only to find out later that they lied to you… but.. it was a area that your knowledge was rather limited and could not call them out at the time ?

It has been reported that Walgreen’s computer system and corporate policies allow a single Pharmacist to BLACK BALL a pt in their system and all Walgreen Pharmacists through out their 8500 stores are required to honor that BLACK BALL and that the only person that can remove that BLACK BALL FLAG is the Pharmacist first entered it.

Some chain stores will chose to BLACK BALL a single or group of prescribers and either direct their Pharmacists to reject all prescriptions from those prescribers or just all controlled medications from those prescribers.

I have been told of some rather inventive “reasons/excuses” why a Pharmacist cannot fill a prescription. I have even had stories related where when the Pharmacist was challenged latter by upper management… could not remember what was said, done or lied about what was said or done. One recent story, the Pharmacist stated that phone calls were made and when the corporation reviewed its phone records, no phone calls had been made to the number(s) the Pharmacist stated was made.

Some Boards of Pharmacy or corporate management may consider lying to pts unprofessional conduct. If you don’t have a video/audio recording of what was said/done… how are you going to prove it. There is a saying in “medicine” … “.. if it is not documented.. it did not happen …”

There are a dozen states that have “two-party” recording laws…but.. those states the laws were written when land-lines were the primary means of private communication. Who believes that standing at the Rx dept register has any hopes of privacy ? Besides, if you notice there are dozens of video cameras watching/recording your ever move in just about every retail outlet.

Remember… there is a WAR ON DRUGS going on since 1970 and those pts that have a valid medical need for controlled medications have become collateral damage of this war. Being a passive patient, will only assure that you will get “taken out”.

 

Another EPIDEMIC that we are BLIND to .. 23,000 deaths each year

blindmice

Short Answers to Hard Questions About Antibiotic Resistance

By SABRINA TAVERNISE, ERICA GOODE and DENISE GRADYMAY 27, 2016

The idea of people dying from infections that were once easily cured may seem outlandish. But it is happening already — taking about 23,000 lives in the United States a year — and experts warn that things will get worse because bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics faster than we can make new drugs to fight back.

We have ourselves to blame, for overusing the drugs in people and squandering them on livestock. Now, a dangerous form of drug resistance has reached the United States, leaving us just one step away from infections that are completely untreatable.

What is antibiotic resistance?

It used to be that infectious diseases were the biggest killers of Americans — illnesses like tuberculosis and pneumonia. The invention of antibiotics, which were developed for medical use in the 1940s, changed all that. But they became overused, and the bugs they were invented to fight started to develop ways of resisting them. For some years now, infectious disease doctors have been warning that unless we rein in use of antibiotics in both people and livestock, there will come a day when they will be powerless against the most ferocious bugs, turning the clock back to the early years of the 20th century.

What is CRE?

CRE, which stands for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, is the most fearsome family of germs because it is resistant even to last-resort antibiotics.

The only drug that reliably treats CRE is colistin, an old and inexpensive drug that came on the market more than 50 years ago. This week researchers reported that they had discovered a gene in a bacteria that makes bugs resistant to colistin. It was found in a strain of E. coli in the urine of a patient in Pennsylvania. The patient was successfully treated, but if that gene makes its way into a strain of CRE, the bug would be unstoppable.

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“We depend on colistin for the worst of the worst,” said Dr. James Johnson, a professor of medicine and an infectious disease expert at the University of Minnesota. “If it is knocked out, in most cases we really have nothing.”

Should I be scared?

Not yet. The discovery does not mean that an otherwise healthy person with a urinary tract infection is in danger of dying from it. (The Pennsylvania woman eventually recovered because her infection was treatable with antibiotics.) But the gene is mobile and can be picked up by other bugs — in sewer systems, in animal feed lots, in people’s guts or urinary tracts. That can make more bugs more resistant. The biggest worry is that a strain of CRE will pick up the gene. That could be devastating for anyone who is suffering from a CRE infection. “That is the combination we are all afraid of,” said Dr. Lance Price, a researcher at George Washington University.

For now, CRE is rare. The CRE germs cause about 600 deaths a year, usually strike people receiving medical care in hospitals or nursing homes, including patients on breathing machines or dependent on catheters. Healthy people are rarely affected.

How has antibiotic resistance changed medicine?

Dr. Johnson from Minnesota says the spread of resistant bugs means doctors are having to blast patients’ infections with increasingly stronger antibiotics. That has led to more patients coming in with infections caused by the C. difficile, a gut germ that flourishes when the patient has taken a lot of antibiotics. (The germ was estimated to cause almost half a million infections in the United States in 2011, and 29,000 people died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis.) Doctors now frequently send patients home with setups for intravenous antibiotics because pills no longer do the trick. Sometimes the specter of resistant infections can delay or cancel surgeries.

Why aren’t there more new antibiotics?

Most drug companies are not eager to make them. Compared with other drugs, antibiotics are not big moneymakers, and some manufacturers have gotten out of the business. Most people take antibiotics just once in a while, for a short time — unlike drugs for blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes, which most patients will take every day for the rest of their lives. When a new antibiotic comes out, doctors may hesitate to prescribe it, wanting to keep it in reserve for tough infections that older drugs cannot cure. Once the drug gets more widespread use, germs may become resistant to it, and doctors will quit prescribing it. So an antibiotic that required lots of time and money to develop may have a short life on the market. Infectious disease experts are working with Congress and the Food and Drug Administration to try to find ways to create financial incentives for drug companies to invest in making new antibiotics.

Is there anything I can do to protect myself?

A few simple steps can help reduce your risk of picking up a dangerous bug, says Dr. Brad Spellberg, chief medical officer for Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center. Wash your hands frequently. If you get sick, try not to use antibiotics. “What you should be doing is saying to the doctor, ‘Do I really need these antibiotics?’ ” he said.

Since hospitals are incubators of dangerous germs, if you end up in one, try to get out as fast as you possibly can. As for whether to avoid meat raised with antibiotics, Dr. Spelling says there is some evidence that such meat is more likely to have resistant germs, but those are avoidable with proper cooking.

Is there any real harm in taking an antibiotic for a cold?

There are several risks. An important one is based on the fact that healthy people normally carry billions of bacteria in their noses, throats, skin, genitals and gut. Antibiotics change the balance of those microbes, killing off susceptible ones and allowing drug-resistant ones to flourish. Even after a person finishes a course of antibiotics, the excess of drug-resistant bacteria can persist for months. If those drug-resistant bacteria find their way into the urinary tract — and normal gut bacteria are a common source of urinary infections — they can cause a drug-resistant infection that may be difficult to treat. In addition, people constantly pass bacteria — including drug-resistant ones — to their close contacts, so they may put others at risk.

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Why are antibiotics given to livestock?

The vast majority of antibiotic use in the United States is in livestock —cows, pigs, chickens, sheep, even farmed fish — either for medical reasons, like treating or preventing disease, or to promote growth. Most of the antibiotics used for humans are also used for livestock, said Dr. Karin Hoelzer, a veterinarian and microbiologist at the Pew Charitable Trusts, who has extensively studied antibiotic resistance.

Antibiotics are believed by many in the food production industry to promote overall health, increasing the number of animals that can be sold for food and improving the quality of the meat.

How can the use of antibiotics in animals pose a risk to humans?

There are several ways. The genes that produce resistance to antibiotics can be easily transferred between bacterial species. So resistant bacteria can pass their resistance to other strains.

Humans can come in contact with resistant bacteria through eating insufficiently cooked meat or other food products: Manure from animals fed antibiotics is commonly used as fertilizer for crops. Farmworkers and people who work in slaughterhouses may also come in contact with the bacteria, providing an opportunity for genes to be exchanged.

Have bacteria resistant to the antibiotic colistin been found elsewhere?

Colistin-resistant bacteria have been found in humans or livestock in countries on every continent, including China, Malaysia, South Africa, Egypt, Italy and several South American nations. Scientists have also reported finding colistin resistance in CRE in some countries, said James Spencer, a senior lecturer in microbiology at Bristol University in England who was a co-author on a 2015 study that reported for the first time finding the colistin-resistance gene in a form that could be easily transferred to other bacteria. The study looked at the presence of the gene in food animals in China.

Has the Food and Drug Administration regulated the use of antibiotics in agriculture?

Under F.D.A policies that will take effect Jan. 1, antibiotics that are considered “medically important” for humans will no longer be approved for use to promote growth in livestock.

The policies also require that a veterinarian supervise the use of antibiotics in feed or water for livestock. Currently, many of the drugs are sold over the counter and do not require the involvement of a veterinarian.

Compliance is voluntary. But the 25 drug companies that manufacture about 283 antibiotics approved for use in livestock have all agreed to change their drug labels to reflect the requirements.

Some critics, however, say they are concerned that the new policies will leave loopholes that could allow food producers to circumvent them.

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stevemailbox Hello! My name is K. We have never meet, but hearing your passion for the pain community has made me reach out. I have been an opiate med user for 5 years. I had a 2 year break in there where I was able to get off the meds. The two years I was off the meds, my life was miserable. My daily routine was to get up for the day force myself to get my kids up and off to school, and then lied down on my couch all day, every day. My pain during those two years was so debilitating that I was unable to do the most basic of tasks at my home. I did a lot of “faking it”. Just so people weren’t constantly asking me what was wrong. I saw many many doctors during those years and have been diagnosed with everything from ankolosying spondylitis to most recently fibromyalgia. I kept changing doctors because I could never Find one that didn’t want to just throw pain meds at me, I wanted someone to figure out why someone who seems to be healthy by looking at me has sooooo much pain on the inside. I even had one dr. tell me I was making it up to get pain meds, when in reality I left my Drs because I was tired of the pain meds and wanted an actual diagnosis and to give me something to help me that wasn’t an opiate. My latest dr. I absolutely adore. I gave up in January and went to see her about getting back on pain meds again because I wasn’t functioning as a mom or wife. Since January I have had to have 3 med changes because my tolerance to opiates has brought me right back to where I was 2 years ago. I have gone from 5/325 Percocet to 10/325 Percocet and currently 15 mg oxycodone. I have been on the 15 mg for a month and already have noticed my tolerance building. I had enough yesterday when the pharmacist treated me like a junkie. My husband and I decided that I am quitting cold turkey this 3 day weekend. I can not continue to live my life that way, where I’m constantly taking more and more opiates just to function during the day. My entire day revolving around taking the next dose. I need an answer, I need something that allows me to function with little pain or at least a manageable pain level without all the negative affects that come with opiates. 2 years ago I had lap band surgery for weight loss, I have been told for years that I would feel better if I lost weight, it’s my weight that’s causing the pain. I was told all this and thought I have tried to loose weight with little success because of my pain levels, so why not try this. I lost 70 lbs and felt worse then when I was at my heaviest. Weight loss obviously is not the solution. This is where you come in. I have hard stories from your patients, I have read a lot about you, but still know so little. If you have made it this far, I appreciate you reading. My question is, what do I do? My worry of what comes after these 3 days of withdrawal. I assume I will be back where I have the debilitating pain. How do I function as a wife and mother? What is my option? I feel so lost and am so dreading next week without meds knowing I will be in pain. If you can suggest anything I would be grateful.

stevemailbox Hello! My name is K. We have never meet, but hearing your passion for the pain community has made me reach out.

I have been an opiate med user for 5 years. I had a 2 year break in there where I was able to get off the meds. The two years I was off the meds, my life was miserable. My daily routine was to get up for the day force myself to get my kids up and off to school, and then lied down on my couch all day, every day. My pain during those two years was so debilitating that I was unable to do the most basic of tasks at my home. I did a lot of “faking it”. Just so people weren’t constantly asking me what was wrong. I saw many many doctors during those years and have been diagnosed with everything from ankolosying spondylitis to most recently fibromyalgia. I kept changing doctors because I could never
Find one that didn’t want to just throw pain meds at me, I wanted someone to figure out why someone who seems to be healthy by looking at me has sooooo much pain on the inside. I even had one dr. tell me I was making it up to get pain meds, when in reality I left my Drs because I was tired of the pain meds and wanted an actual diagnosis and to give me something to help me that wasn’t an opiate. My latest dr. I absolutely adore. I gave up in January and went to see her about getting back on pain meds again because I wasn’t functioning as a mom or wife. Since January I have had to have 3 med changes because my tolerance to opiates has brought me right back to where I was 2 years ago. I have gone from 5/325 Percocet to 10/325 Percocet and currently 15 mg oxycodone. I have been on the 15 mg for a month and already have noticed my tolerance building. I had enough yesterday when the pharmacist treated me like a junkie. My husband and I decided that I am quitting cold turkey this 3 day weekend. I can not continue to live my life that way, where I’m constantly taking more and more opiates just to function during the day. My entire day revolving around taking the next dose. I need an answer, I need something that allows me to function with little pain or at least a manageable pain level without all the negative affects that come with opiates.

2 years ago I had lap band surgery for weight loss, I have been told for years that I would feel better if I lost weight, it’s my weight that’s causing the pain. I was told all this and thought I have tried to loose weight with little success because of my pain levels, so why not try this. I lost 70 lbs and felt worse then when I was at my heaviest. Weight loss obviously is not the solution.

This is where you come in. I have hard stories from your patients, I have read a lot about you, but still know so little. If you have made it this far, I appreciate you reading. My question is, what do I do? My worry of what comes after these 3 days of withdrawal. I assume I will be back where I have the debilitating pain. How do I function as a wife and mother? What is my option? I feel so lost and am so dreading next week without meds knowing I will be in pain. If you can suggest anything I would be grateful.

Where did we lose our way ?

wethepeople

Where did we lose our way ?

found in our news files dates August 16, 1945, the day after the Japanese surrendered and World War II ended, “The guns are silent now and so are many of the men whose hands once held them. Never again will they see their wives or mothers. Never again will they hear their children laugh. And never again will they smell the sweet scents of home. And for what? For what did these husbands and fathers, these brothers and sons, give their lives so many thousands of miles from home? I say it was for one word, and that word is freedom. The freedom to pray. To write. To speak. To feel. To be. As we see fit, and not as others would dictate to us. To this freedom, which has been so dearly bought for us, it is up to us, the living, to dedicate our lives and our futures… to its eternal protection.”

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